Contraceptive decision making after the 2016 United States Presidential Election

Abstract

In the days following the 2016 US presidential election, calls for women to obtain long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), including intrauterine devices and subdermal implants, began trending on social media.1Citing concerns for increased costs and restricted insurance coverage, women advocated for contraceptive methods that would “outlast” an administration perceived to be hostile to reproductive health, and news media outlets amplified these concerns.2,3 Large health systems data have recently corroborated anecdotal reports of increased demand for LARC-related appointments following the election.

Judge C, Borrero S. Contraceptive decision making after the 2016 United States Presidential Election. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2017; 217(1):88-90. PMID: 28366732.

Date Published

July 2017